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Beenie Man

 

Anthony Moses Davis (born 22 August 1973),[2] better known by his stage name Beenie Man, is a Grammy award-winning Jamaican reggae artist. He is referred to as the world's "King of Dancehall".

Bounty Killa

 

Bounty Killer (born Rodney Basil Price; 12 June 1972; Kingston, Jamaica) is a Jamaican reggae and dancehalldeejay. He is the founder of a dancehall collective known as The Alliance with deejay Mavado.

Elephant Man

 

Born in Kingston, Jamaica, he started out his musical career as a member of the Scare Dem Crew, later continuing as a solo artist. He was later characterised for several trademarks, such as his dyed yellow-orange hair, his unique low-key voice, and his stage performance, which included jumping and running, or even climbing on stage props and monitors

Mr Vegas

 

Smith was born in Kingston in 1974.[1] The moniker "Mr. Vegas" was given to Smith by his schoolyard football-mates, who thought that he kicked the ball like a Las Vegas dancer. In his early years as a singjay, Vegas sang covers of Jamaican hits at local parties and shows, and acquired a reputation as a troublemaker for his lyrics. During a scuffle over stolen master tapes, Vegas was hit in the face with a crowbar and had his jaw wired shutfor six weeks. Vegas claims that, after hearing Beenie Man's hit "Who Am I", he immediately demanded that his still-healing jaw be unwired, changing his speech pattern but allowing him to practice toasting.

He found fame in 1998 with hits such as "Yu Sure", "Jack It Up", and "Latest News".[1] For his first major hit, Vegas versioned the wildly popular "Playground" Riddim (Sean Paul's "Infiltrate" among others) to create "Nike Air", which became a huge hit in Jamaica. The next single, "Heads High", with an anti-oral sex lyric,[2] followed its success in Jamaica with a chart run in the UK and a No. 69 peak on the US R&B chart, and Vegas became increasingly in demand as a guest artist by acts such as Sean Paul

Tony Curtis

 

Tony Curtis started singing at an early age, his first musical accomplishment was winning a talent show in Ocho Rios, Jamaica in 1991.

He got his musical influence from popular R&B singer such as Luther Vandros, Sam Cooke, Stevie Wonder and reggae singers Bob Marley and Dennis Brown.

He continued singing mostly doing cover version of popular R&b hits.

In 2002 his got his first big break into the dancehall and reggae music industry. This was due to the released of his self produced hit single "High Grade", a track from his album titled "Stronge" which was released that same year.

Tony Curtis is a solo artists but is also a member of reggae quartet group called L.U.S.T, the members of the group are himself, Lukie-D, Thriller-U and Singing Melody.


 

Chino

 

Son of reggae legend Freddie McGregor, Daniel “Chino” McGregor is a Jamaican singjay whose star began to rise in 2010, thanks to his “global” style of dancehall. Growing up in a musical household meant Chino was exposed to many genres beyond his beloved reggae, but it was a move to America and a job at the label Slip N Slide that really expanded his style. With artists like Trick Daddy and Trinahanging around the office, Chino was well-versed in the Dirty South sound by the time he headed back to Jamaica. Back home, he launched his career under the name Cappuccino and was soon co-writing songs and producing tracks for the likes of TOK, Elephant Man, and Daville. In 2011, by then using the name Chino, he released the EPFrom Mawning, along with the album Chino...The Autobiography of Daniel McGregor. Both appeared on the VP label.
 

Ding Dong

 

Ding Dong is founder of dancing group Ravers Clavers. ... Ding Dong - Dip Again · Ding Dong - Reggae On The Beach 2010 · Ding Dong and Voicemail - shout

Leroy Gibbons

 

Leroy Gibbons burst on the dancehall scene in the mid-1980s with his strong voice and Lovers Rock style

Snow

 

Darrin Kenneth O'Brien (born October 30, 1969), better known by his stage name Snow, is a Canadian reggaemusician. He is best known for his 1993 single "Informer", which reached No. 1 on the US Billboard Hot 100

 

Snow was born and raised in the North York district of Toronto, Ontario. For much of his childhood, he lived in the Allenbury Gardens public housing project, and at the age of 16 moved to Ajax, Ontario. Growing up in a diverse neighbourhood, O'Brien blended dancehall and reggae with rock and popular music to create his own unique style of music. In 1988, Jamaican-born DJ Marvin Prince witnessed O'Brien deejaying at a party and the two quickly became friends. For the next few years, they practiced in Prince's basement with Snow providing vocals and Prince scratching the turntables. While on a trip to New York City, Prince mentioned Snow to rap star M.C. Shan. Shan then invited Snow to New York and introduced him to music producers, David Eng and Steve Salem. Snow eventually signed a contract to record on their Motorjam/Elektra record label and in 1993 released his debut album 12 Inches of Snow.

While Snow served prison time for an attempted murder charge, M.C. Shan, David Eng, Steve Salem, and Marvin Prince promoted the recordings. Upon his release from prison, Snow's first single "Informer", written by Snow, M.C. Shan, and Edmond Leary, became a chart-topping hit. The album sold over 8 million records worldwide, with the "Informer" single remaining number 1 on the American Billboard charts for seven consecutive weeks. "Informer" has been recorded twice in the Guinness Book of World Records as the best selling reggae single in US history, as well as the highest charting reggae single in history. A second single, "Girl I've Been Hurt", reached Number 19 on the Hot 100.[8] In Japan, Snow received theRecording Industry Association of Japan's 1994 Gold Disc Award for Best New Artist.  

 

Dawn Penn
 

Dawn Penn is one of the original queens of reggae music. A native of Kingston, Jamaica, she grew up in a musical family, studying piano, classical violin and performing with her sisters Pat and Audrey in churches. Her first recording was “When I’m Gonna Be Free” was in 1966. She then recorded for the legendary Coxsone Dodd at Studio One and her first hit came in 1967 with the title “You Don’t Love Me – No, No, No”, one of the most famous reggae hits of all-time which has been covered by countless artists around the world including Beyonce, Rihanna, Sean Paul, Wu-Tang Clan, Eve, J Millz and Lily Allen. 

 

Over the next several years several singles were released including three: “Blue Yes Blue”, “Here’s The Key” and Long Day Short Night” on Prince Buster’s Label. In 1970, she moved to Tortola in the British Virgin Islands to explore her roots on her father’s side. She returned to Jamaica in 1987, re-recording her single You Don’t Love Me” with Steelie and Cleavie in 1991. Steelie & Cleavie’s version (which they recorded to commemorate Studio One’s 35th Anniversary) was a crossover hit in the mainstream pop charts and was picked up by Heartbeat in the U.S. King Jammy’s recording that was done the year before with Bounty Killer, Dennis Brown and Ken Boothe, under separate recording on the Greensleeves label became a dancehall smash. 

 

In 1993, Big Beat (Atlantic Records) signed Penn to an 8-year album deal, and by the following year she was back on the charts with her re-recorded dancehall version of “You Don’t Love Me – No, No, No”. The single charted in 53 countries, was featured in advertisements for Nissan and Churchill and the album was nominated for a Grammy Award. In 1995 she produced and recorded her original track “What Do You Do?”, followed up by Delroy Williams and herself producing the album called “Come Again” on Trojan Records which sold close to 110,000 copies. Her 2000 single “Never Ever” was released on Jet Star, becoming a smash hit on BBC Radio 1.